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Plan on a Page: Part 2 of Using Your District Improvement Plan to Drive Action

Updated: Oct 12, 2022

It is generally recommended to only strive for two or three main goals at one time. Otherwise, our efforts can become so divided we end up losing the outcomes we are trying to reach. In this blog, I will introduce you to a concept called "Plan on a Page." I first came across this from reading an article and following it to a district website that used this idea.

Plan on a Page


To win a game, coaches create a plan. They utilize the strengths of the players and analyze the obstacles. They create "plays" or strategies to overcome the challenges.

Each player knows their role and executes it to the best of their ability to achieve a team win.


Plan on a Page is a document with all the district goals, performance measures, prioritized strategies, timelines, and formative assessments for the district AND all of the campuses ALL ON ONE PAGE! Creating one will get your team focused and rowing together to achieve more!


Once it is complete, you now have a focus document with talking points to use throughout the district. Obviously, if you have five or more campuses, your Plan on a Page will take more than one page but maybe you can fit it on front and back so you still only have one page.


As much as possible, create the same Goals, Performance Objectives, and Priority Strategies for the district and for each of the campuses. Customize them to fit the needs of the campus, but also align them to the established priorities of the district.


Use the Plan on a Page at leadership meetings, campus site-based team meetings, with teachers, parents, or anyone else who may be involved or interested in knowing the focus areas for the campus or district.


Here are a few tips for an effective Plan on a Page.

  1. Goals are broad. Use the same goals for the district and campuses (or something very similar).

  2. Performance Objectives are measurable and should be written in the SMART goal format. Use the same objectives across the district if possible, but also customize them for the grade levels and data sources of the individual campuses.

  3. Priority strategies should directly support the Performance Objectives. Again, consistency across the district is the key but customize to the campuses as needed.

  4. Data to Monitor should be specific. Sources listed should generate specific, measurable data points.


Example Plan on a Page


As much as possible, create the same Goals, Performance Objectives, and Priority Strategies for the district and for each of the campuses. Customize them to fit the needs of the campus, but also align them to the established priorities of the district.


Linking Plan on a Page to Program Evaluation

Good data points also lead to good evaluation data. Remember, all programs require program evaluations. I consistently find that schools struggle with effective program evaluation and lack data points. Spend the time to really think through what data you can evaluate (or need to generate) to determine if your Performance Objectives are being met.


Download the example Plan on a Page on our Freebies link.


We'll discuss Program Evaluation in another blog post.


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